The Loneliness of the Black libertarian Part 1

Having a skin tone roughly the same shade as our current commander-in-chief makes it difficult to be a libertarian. It means you’re not a “team player.” It means you’re on the wrong side of history. And it means you’ve got a lot of explaining to do.

“What do you mean you do don’t support President Obama?”

I usually reply by offering a laundry list of other policies and policy makers I don’t support — everything from FDR’s New Deal to George Bush’s No Child Left Behind — but my critics remain unmoved.
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The fact is that being a black libertarian, in any era, means being as intellectually lonely as the Maytag repairman. I suppose I’m not totally alone. There’s the brilliant Walter Williams. There’s Thomas Sowell (okay, he’s more of a conservative, but he has moments of clarity that suggest he could switch teams any day). There’s a Facebook page called African Americans for Libertarianism (which should be followed by any lover of liberty regardless of race). And according to Wikipedia, comedian Chris Rock belongs in our ranks (although his embarrassing fawning over our president puts his libertarian street cred in serious jeopardy).

But how did this lonely condition become our reality? How did a people who spent their first few centuries as Americans in chains  come to be so violently opposed to liberty?

I’ll tackle that question tomorrow…