Free-Market Libertarians are Today’s Flat-Earthers

[This article was originally posted on Reformed Libertarian] They certainly are. Just not in the sense, though, that a lot of readers might imagine. Let me explain. What is it that typically keeps people from embracing free-market capitalism as a system of exchange? Or how about libertarianism in general? The initial stumbling blocks today, of […]

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Put Yourself in the Government’s Shoes

…Just bear in mind that those shoes might cost a good $16 trillion, give or take. So, not surprisingly, the ever-steadfast State apologist Lindsey Graham doesn’t balk at the idea of a secret, warrantless NSA seizure of phone records: “I am a Verizon customer,” he recently said. “You can have my phone number, and put […]

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Egocentrism’s Role in Freedom

Let’s not pretend: egocentrism certainly plays some role in the mind of anyone who desires to do anything that he or she wants to do. That person will seek out the greatest benefit for himself or herself, pursuing some end result (hopefully positive) that comes from fulfilling one’s own wishes. Famously, even the Framers saw […]

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Internet Taxes Will Encourage Underground Commerce

The senators who just voted in favor of the so-called Marketplace Fairness Act of 2013 (S.336) will continue to wax eloquent about its benefits. Colorado’s Mark Udall whines about how “[i]t does not seem fair for a business that establishes a presence in Colorado to be at a disadvantage to a company that sells goods […]

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Government Sovereignty Destroys Consumer Sovereignty

One aspect of capitalism is that it’s about the sovereignty of the consumer. With that understanding, we can plainly see that any businesses that advance themselves through (1) subsidy handouts and/or (2) land-grabbing, eminent domain deals are reliant on nothing more and nothing less than the government. They aren’t reliant on a free-market. These are tricks of […]

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Mark Twain on Government

Judge Andrew Napolitano had it right when he said, to paraphrase, that U.S. Democrats and Republicans are the same Big Government Party, with a Welfare wing and a Warfare wing. When all you’re fighting over most of the time is a 15% increase in far too much spending already vs. a 20% one, it can’t […]

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No, Jesus Doesn’t “Support” Your Token Legislation

There’s that old tendency on the part of some leftists to misuse the ministry of Jesus Christ for political advantage. That’s where something like this emerges: A couple of initial responses. First, it’s obvious even from a cursory reading of the New Testament that Jesus’ “healthcare” only consisted of supernatural healing. I wouldn’t count on […]

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I Won’t Bail You Out if You Won’t Bail Me Out!

Isn’t it true that advocates of free market capitalism support allowing corporations to do whatever the hell they want? Not exactly. First of all, a free market would involve completely eliminating government subsidies and benefits for private companies – clearly, that’s the total opposite of what the Bush and Obama wings of big government have put […]

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The Strength of Non-Interventionism as a Foreign Policy

It was exciting over the weekend to hear about the launch of Ron Paul’s Institute for Peace and Prosperity. Recalling one of the infamous debates during the last election cycle, where he was booed after suggesting the “Golden Rule” be applied to foreign policy, it’s obvious that Paul’s detractors just couldn’t get with that part of his […]

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Government Intervention in U.S. Agriculture: Part 8

One of the more significant consequences of government-mandated food underproduction wouldn’t be market prices or income, but the sudden necessity for rationing by WWII. As historian John M. Dobson observes, the war had “rendered many of the restrictions on agricultural production irrelevant… shortages and rationing became the order of the day rather than production limitations.” There’s […]

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Government Intervention in U.S. Agriculture: Part 7

Following the Supreme Court’s decision in United States v. Butler that the Agricultural Adjustment Act of 1933 was in violation of the Constitution, the law would be replaced by a new Agricultural Adjustment Act of 1938. Its updated provisions were intended to be permanent, unless amended by any future legislation. It had some notable changes […]

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Government Intervention in U.S. Agriculture: Part 6

One of the best ways of understanding the burden that Depression-era agricultural programs created is by looking at their results on prices and personal income. Using data figures from a six-year period during the 1930s, a 2005 study by Fishback, Horrace, and Kantor seeks to establish precisely what effect the Agricultural Adjustment Act – and its ensuing […]

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Government Intervention in U.S. Agriculture: Part 5

A great deal of farmers who spoke out against FDR’s Agricultural Adjustment Act argued from a basic economic standpoint. What they pointed to was the incidence of far more relevant factors in the country, two of which were a fundamental under-consumption of food and a large deficiency in the distribution of goods. These things, they […]

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Government Intervention in U.S. Agriculture: Part 4

Having looked at the biggest farm program of Hoover’s administration in Part 3, we’ll move on now to some of the policies of Franklin Roosevelt. The Agricultural Adjustment Act (AAA) of 1933, much like Hoover’s AMA, would prove to be yet another version of government-assisted monopoly. By decreasing the supply of food and related goods, […]

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