Aggregating the best in libertarian news daily from a number of leading sites:
The Beacon, FEE, Laissez-Faire, Lew Rockwell, Personal Liberty,
Reason, Scott Adams & Sex & The State. See our Sources

Obamacare’s Perverse Job-Creation Program

The latest jobs report gave the stock market a boost and injected some optimism into public sentiment about our economic prospects. Unfortunately, there’s a problem with the current employment situation that few understand: Obamacare has likely led to too many jobs in health care, drawing labor from more productive functions. Dan Diamond of Politico…
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Adversarial Justice and Police Misconduct

We all know from the TV series Law and Order that, “In the criminal justice system, the people are represented by two separate, yet equally important, groups: the police, who investigate crime; and the district attorneys, who prosecute the offenders.” Day in and day out, these two groups work shoulder-to-shoulder for a common cause….
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Does Pell Propel College Graduates?

Earlier this year, the Congressional Budget Office projected a $7.8 billion temporary surplus for the federal Pell Grant program next year—and some members of Congress can’t wait to spend it on year-round disbursements, which were eliminated in 2011 but recently revived in the Senate. (See here and here also). The concept has enjoyed bi-partisan…
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Government Price Controls and Drug Addiction

In the print edition of the latest issue of National Review, staff writer David French has a sobering article describing how the Veterans Health Administration is overdosing veterans on prescription drugs. A veteran himself, French has plenty of anecdotes about his buddies: They couldn’t sleep, so they had to take Ambien. They were depressed,…
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Even When School Choice Works, Critics Call it a Failure

Thomas Paine recommended vouchers to help parents afford private schools for their children more than 200 years ago. While most college students today use vouchers to attend public or private colleges and universities, the concept remains needlessly controversial when it comes to parents using them for their school-age children. For example, in a recent Washington…
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A Glimpse into the College Entitlement Mentality

Should a college education be a handout or something earned? A recent feature in The New Yorker Magazine provides a sobering glimpse of things to come if advocates of “free college” get their way. In his feature article “The Big Uneasy,” author Nathan Heller interviewed several Oberlin College students who demanded, among other things,…
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What Iran Can Teach Us About Selling Kidneys

A few weeks ago, I had the opportunity to participate in a debate on the PBS program, Point Taken with Carlos Watson. The program brings together four experts in different fields to debate relevant and controversial topics. The goal of the show is to inform, to present viewers and the live audience with different…
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Have a Student Loan Question? Take a Number and Wait in Line

“[E]rrors and poor customer service.” That’s how the federal government watchdog, the Government Accountability Office, summed up the US Department of Education’s handling of $96 billion in federal higher education loans affecting more than 9 million student borrowers. So much for the improved service and efficiency we were promised more than 30 years ago…
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School may be out, but the criticism of Common Core Isn’t Taking a Vacation

As the school year was winding down, results from the most recent National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), also known as the Nation’s Report Card, showed flat reading performance, and a decline in math performance among high school seniors compared to their pre-Common Core predecessors. So much for college-readiness. “Worrisome” and “stalled” were just…
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Don’t Blame “Underfunding” for Soaring College Prices

Death, taxes, and rising college prices – these are among life’s few certainties. A new study helps shed led on the latter. As the Washington Post’s Danielle Douglas-Gabriel reports: Using Department of Education data, Seton Hall University professor Robert Kelchen found that inflation-adjusted fees grew faster than tuition at state schools between the 1999-2000 and 2012-2013…
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Hospitals and Insurers Are Dropping the Ball

An advocate of consumer-driven health care, who makes the case that individuals should control most of our health spending directly, will not get very far before hearing the rebuttal: “When you have a heart attack or get hit by a bus, you won’t be in any condition to negotiate which hospital you go to.”…
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