Babylon Bee CEO Said Elon Musk Called To Confirm Their Suspension From Twitter Before Taking His Stake

April 6, 2022   |   Tags:
Babylon Bee CEO Said Elon Musk Called To Confirm Their Suspension From Twitter Before Taking His Stake

Twitter banning parody news site The Babylon Bee seemed to be the straw that broke the camel's back for Elon Musk.

Seth Dillon, the CEO of The Babylon Bee, noted on Twitter yesterday that Musk had reached out to him before taking his stake in the company, to confirm that the Bee had, in fact, been suspended from the social media site. 

Dillon also wrote that Musk was potentially considering buying the company. "He even mused on that call that he might need to buy Twitter. Now he's the largest shareholder and has a seat on the board," he wrote. 

Recall, The Babylon Bee’s editor-in-chief Kyle Mann was also placed in ‘twitter jail’, locked out of his account for suggesting that Twitter might lift its original suspension “if we throw a few thousand Uighurs in a concentration camp.”

The comment was likely a reference to Twitter allowing Communist Chinese Party PR people and apologists to operate freely on the platform.

As we covered, Seth Dillon appeared on on Tucker Carlson’s show last month to speak about the original suspension of the Babylon Bee by Twitter for for promoting a parody article about transgender Biden Assistant Secretary for Health Rachel Levine being the “man of the year.”

Now that Musk has a board seat on the social media company's Board of Directors, there continues to be discussion about whether or not Musk may push to have former President Donald Trump's account on the platform reinstated. 

According to Musk's 13G filing, he had accumulated 73,486,938 shares of Twitter, representing a 9.2% (based on 800,641,166 shares of Common Stock outstanding). The stake is worth nearly $2.9 billion, based on last Friday's closing price. 

The filing comes about ten days after Musk tweeted that the social media company is "failing to adhere to free speech principles fundamentally undermines democracy." He asks his audience of more than 80 million people: "What should be done?" 

The stake also comes two days after founder Jack Dorsey partially blames himself for the state of the internet today, admitting that "centralizing discovery and identity into corporations really damaged the internet."

Wedbush analyst Dan Ives told CNBC's "Squawk Box" earlier this week that the billionaire "could try to take a more aggressive stance here on Twitter," adding "this could eventually lead to some sort of buyout."

The current mood of woke Twitter employees... 

Tyler Durden Wed, 04/06/2022 - 16:40


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